High-Conflict Divorces with Personality Disorders

Divorce is never easy but divorcing someone with a personality disorder can be especially trying. If you are going through a divorce with someone with a personality disorder and looking for a divorce lawyer Orlando FL, then you should know a few things. Here are 3 things to consider as you go through the process.

1.     Lookout for Parental Alienation

If you and your ex-spouse do not agree on custody, the divorce process is fertile ground for contention. But a spouse with a personality disorder such as Borderline Personality Disorder or Narcissism can make things even worse. Sometimes these people will actively triangulate the children and try to turn them against you. This can sometimes negatively impact the secure attachment that has been developed and have lasting repercussions.

2.     Be Prepared to Combat Lies with Truth

Unfortunately, lying is viewed as commonplace by many in the divorce process. By those with personality disorders tend to be compulsive liars and can make up harmful lies about you and your character that put you in a defensive position. Before going through the process, try to document and gather as much evidence as possible to support yourself and any accusations you make, as well as protect against those made against you.

3.     Stay Calm and Get Help

High-conflict divorces with those with personality disorders can get volatile. Your ex-spouse may do many things to try to provoke you and paint you in a bad light. Though it may be hard, you must stay calm, have very strong boundaries and engage only when you must and in a diplomatic way. Let your ex be the one to draw attention and have faith that their behaviors will be clearly demonstrated over the course of the proceedings. Use your support system and consider enlisting a counselor.

Divorces with an ex who has a personality disorder can be very trying. Parental alienation, lies and chaos are just some of the things that can occur through the proceedings. Stay calm, get support and focus on the behaviors more than the emotions.